Travel Therapy: Namibia Part 2- How The Other Half Live

Continuing upon my 3 week tour, I had the pleasure of meeting young like minded Namibians along the way. We all sat around, joked, drank and shared cool music from our countries. When the conversation turned to more serious matters (yes by me!) I was quite surprised with what I found. 

I guess what initially struck me was the very apparent disparity between the haves and have nots. As per my last post – without an offering of a welfare system, the poor people have limited to no help with mental health issues. However, with my new friends I discovered any kind of therapy they needed was right there to be experienced for a certain price of course. I thought being a third world country they may not have access to CBT, NLP or any other dynamic approach to psychotherapy, I was wrong. There were many trained therapists in Namibia. 

But what they all seemed to share was the apparent speed in which they had been prescribed anti-depressants. My first question was to ask why a lot of them needed/wanted to go to therapy in the first place. Funnily enough, it was similar reasons to my fellow peers in the UK- anxiety with what to do in life, depressed about who they were, too much recreational drug use and just an overwhelming question of who they were and where they fitted in. 

I understand there is certainly a place for anti-depressants, and indeed have some friends who have needed them. But to be sat in a group and told about the frequency of how many times they have been prescribed meds, seemed a bit odd to me. 

It was clear the majority of them felt the anti-depressants were turning them into zombies and not actually solving their issues. Instead, they’ve learnt to talk to each other. This includes men, I could be making a generalisation here but I would go so far as to say that Namibian men (of a certain background) are a lot more content about sharing their feelings, being open and asking each other for help. Indeed aside from that, what I found totally refreshing was how open both men and women were to these kinds of topics; I even witnessed how healing it was to be in a large group where everyone felt comfortable enough to share their thoughts. 

This is something I shall try to bring back to the UK with me. So be ready everyone – group sharing shall be coming to a place near you soon 😬

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Travel Therapy: 1st Country – Namibia, Part 1.

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January 2017 saw the start of my world travels for 4 months, ok I say world, I mean 3 continents! I had many aims for these travels, self development and cultural growth to name a couple. But I also wanted to expand upon the Psychotherapy Course I undertook last year in London. What I really wanted to find out was how other countries dealt with mental health issues, addictions and whether having a therapist was as fashionable as it is in the UK & USA. Apart from simply learning, I also wanted to see if there were any techniques other countries used that could potentially be brought back to the UK, to form a new dynamic approach – maybe the Pasc Approach?!

My first stop was Namibia, and I was fortunate to be staying with a lady who introduced me to a great charity out there: Sister Namibia. Here they explained the biggest issue the country faces is with GBV (Gender Based Violence). This is the root cause for the majority of crimes, depression and death. The charity has found that the majority of GBV is due to the fact that men are depressed that women are becoming more equal in education and jobs, which in turn gives them more life choice. Domestic abuse, rape and murder all occur at the hands of men who cannot grasp the understanding that it is good for there to be equality and that it doesn’t make them any less of a man.

Charities such as Sister Namibia, but also a movement called MenEngage are the helping hands this issue needs. MenEngage seek to educate men about gender equality, their mission statement is for Equality to not be seen as taking power away from men, but to empower women. They offer counselling services; programmes and training which address behaviour change. These are invaluable and have clear results in reducing the crime levels of GBV.

As there is no NHS in Namibia, there certainly isn’t free therapy on hand, which is hard to see given such levels of depression in men and extreme damaging affects on women. I did come across one charity which offers free psychological therapy, Regain Trust. Here they offer individual and group counselling sessions with expert psychotherapists, and hold 4 month workshops to empower women and give them the ability to speak up.

What is clear from the work these charities do, is that psychotherapy and counselling techniques are the way forward in helping to combat these issues. Whilst I often find many flaws with our health care system in the UK, I shall count myself lucky that we have any help at all. However, it does also show that we need to continue being at the forefront of this profession and lead the way for the rest of the world.